Centre for Psychology and Counselling


Clinical Psychology, Counselling, Psychotherapy, Psychoanalysis (Jungian) and Dream Analysis.


(Online counselling via Skype or phone will be considered)



Princess Chambers, 27 Market St, Fremantle, WA

 

Brittain Garrett Psychoanalyst (Jungian)

Email Brittain
        
     Mob: 0417 958 658   

BA (Hons). (Philosophy), University of Colorado, Boulder;
Advanced Diploma Psychotherapy,
Diplomate C G Jung Institute (ANZSJA)

Counselling and Psychotherapy for adults, adolescents and couples.   Suitable for:

Anxiety                            Relationship issues   
Depression                      Personal growth   
Anger                              Questions of meaning   
Grief                                Dream analysis           
Trauma  

Brittain has been in private practice for almost twenty years.   She works at the level that suits the individual.  Sometimes short term counselling for specific problems and conscious behaviour changes may be appropriate.  Other individuals benefit from working at a deeper level and may be suitable for psychoanalysis.

Jungian psychoanalysis aims to link conscious behaviour with unconscious instincts, patterns, and libido.   It offers the individual the opportunity to explore the various influences, patterns, complexes and instincts that drive them.  There is a gradual uncovering of the deeper layers of psyche, a chance to see beyond the collection of voices, expectations and patterns of behaviour we have come to be.  It gives room to explore questions of meaning and desire.   What do I want?  What has meaning and purpose for me?

Professional Associations:

Australia New Zealand Society of Jungian Analysts (ANZSJA)     -    www.anzsja.org.au

International Association of Analytical Psychologists (IAAP)     -    www.IAAP.org

also C G Jung Society of Western Australia    -    www.jungwa.org

The unconscious makes itself felt in dreams, strong emotions and in relationship.¬† In the analysis, through dreamwork, and through the relationship, we try to understand the material that arises symbolically, that is, meaningfully.¬†¬† Carl Jung says that the transcendent function of the symbol is to make the unconscious felt in conscious life. (CW6, par 205)¬†¬† The symbol is not a just random image arising from the unconscious, but relates to the conscious situation at the moment.¬† ‚ÄúWhy this dream now?‚Ä̬† It is an expression of both unconscious and conscious elements.¬†

By attending to and consciously elaborating the material that arises within the analysis, a collaboration of the unconscious and conscious becomes possible and the transcendent function of the symbol reveals itself. This revelation is a new way of apprehending the world that is experiential, rather than intellectual.  

Brittain also offers supervision to trainees and clinicians.